Endangered Animals

A blog for bringing awareness to and celebrating all endangered animals- from the cute and cuddly to the strange and unusual.

May 12, 2013 9:31 am

DESIGN-A-DINO (or prehistoric critter) GIVEAWAY!

abarero:

Ever wanted your favorite obscure dinosaur/prehistoric critter in a little felted/fleece plush? Well here’s your chance to get one!

image

Prehistoric Plush Pals on Etsy

1. REBLOG THIS POST with the name of the dinosaur/prehistoric critter you’d love to have made into a plush.

2. You may reblog TWICE, in case you need to pick ONE dinosaur and ONE non-dinosaur prehistoric critter. 

3. Your two reblogs will be your entries for the contest, which will end Monday the 13th when I wake up (which is usually about 9am CST).

4. Anyone who makes a purchase of any of my four existing critters on etsy and gives me their tumblr name via a message there with payment will be given 10 extra entries into the giveaway!

5. The winning reblog (which will be chosen with a random number generator with the extra entries added in) will have their plush prehistoric critter made in the color of their choice and shipped to them.

6. 2 Runners up will get their chosen prehistoric critter made into my pattern inventory and receive half-off on ordering any of my plush.

7. So reblog away! I can’t wait to see what obscure prehistoric creatures you come up with!

CONTEST ENDS TOMORROW! So reblog with up to two prehistoric critters!

May 3, 2013 10:58 am

abarero:

My prehistoric plush after a supply run! I’ll be selling these little guys on an order-by-order basis. Right now I just have these three finished, but I wanted to spread the word that I AM SELLING THESE CUTE LITTLE GUYS BECAUSE I NEED MONEY.

To give you an idea of size, the little pink T-Rex in the back is about the size of a pop can in both width (ignoring his tail) and height.

If you would like one of these little guys- please PM me! I will let you know the colors I have available for both the plush itself and the wiggly eyes.

I’m asking $8 for the T-Rex, $10 for the Glyptodon and $12 for the Plesiosaur. S/H will be based on where I’m sending it to.

I will hand stitch your requested critter up and ship him to you as soon as I can.  So please spread the word to paleo-nerds out there! If you have a suggestion for a prehistoric critter to try my hand at next- PM me that as well. Ones I get a lot of requests for will definitely get made!

May 27, 2012 9:45 pm

askerquestioner

lovelifeitsshort-deactivated201: omg who would say that??

No idea. Hahah so random. It reminds me that I should update this blog though.

9:42 pm

askerquestioner

Anonymous: FUCK U.

omg most random blog to get hate on ever. a+

December 16, 2011 3:39 pm

askerquestioner

Anonymous: Vancouver Island Marmot?

Thanks for the suggestion. They are adorable! I remember seeing a wild marmot in Colorado (not a Vancouver Island one, obviously), and being so excited… 

December 14, 2011 8:24 pm

askerquestioner

Anonymous: porbeagles? :)

Good idea. We’ll get to some more sharks in the future! 

December 9, 2011 10:43 pm

THE UNKNOWN PERIL OF THE PANGOLIN
I have permission from demiveemon on deviantart to post this here. The original deviantart post is HERE. Thank you for your permission! This is a little feature on the animal featured in our default icon, the pangolin. PLEASE SPREAD THIS POST! 
——-
It’s become obvious to us that very few people know of the existence of an animal called pangolin. Out of those, an even smaller fraction know that these amazing animals are rapidly facing extinction due to poachery and a never ending appetite for their meat and body parts on the Chinese and Vietnam black market.Over the past hours we’ve gathered information and photos from the internet and it’s been a stomach twisting experience. We hereby want to turn the spotlight on the pangolin’s plight and bring it to public attention so please, spare some minutes of your time and keep on reading. 8 things everyone needs know about the pangolin’s peril and the burgeoning black market: * The demand for pangolins and their body parts stems almost exclusively from East and Southeast Asia, and especially from China and Vietnam.* Pangolin meat is consumed as a delicacy, while their scales, blood, and fetuses are used to make traditional medicines. Subscribers of this ideology superstitiously use these substances to treat a number of health issues; for example, to reduce swelling, improve liver function, boost weight loss, stimulate blood circulation, increase fertility, and to enhance lactation in breast-feeding women. Stuffed pangolins are sold as souvenirs and ornamental displays, and their skin and scales are also used to make fashion accessories.* There is no scientific evidence to support the medicinal claims surrounding the use of pangolin scales or body parts. In fact, the scales—which are one of the most sought after parts of the animal—are made of keratin, the same protein that our own hair and nails, horse hooves, and rhino horn are composed of. Scientific studies on rhino horn have repeatedly proven it to be void of any medicinal properties, which suggests the same is true of pangolin scales.* All eight species of pangolin are currently listed on the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) Appendix II, which means only limited trade is permitted. However, a zero annual export quota has been established for all four Asian species, which means no pangolins can be exported from any country in the world. Many countries have also established legislation to further protect these animals from poaching.* Pangolins do not survive well in captivity, which means essentially all of these animals in the illegal trade have been sourced from the wild. This has devastating impacts for remaining populations.* As with most illegal wildlife trade, organized crime syndicates have commercialized the exploitation of these animals and are the largest suppliers of this black market industry. As pangolins are fairly slow in reproduction, they are being harvested at rates far above what they are capable of replenishing populations at.* All four Asian species are threatened with extinction. The Chinese and Sunda pangolins are listed as endangered, while the Indian and Malayan species are both classified as ‘Near Threatened’.* There are, currently, no reliable estimates for population sizes, as their elusive, nocturnal nature challenges researchers’ ability to study them in their habitat. Basically, we have no firm idea of how many may remain in the wild, meaning the most endangered species may be perilously close to extinction.”Quote Source: [link]What you can do:* The far easiest action you can take is by simply spreading the word! The major reason for the vast poaching of pangolins is the misbelief that medicine based on bodyparts and bodyfluids of exotic animals would have any beneficial effect on your health, sexuality or luck. In the long run only a change of attitude and education can bring an end to this atrocity.* Visit these pages for more information on what you can do and the possibility to make a donation. Savepangolins.org [link]Bushwarriors.org [link]Traffic.org [link]* Don’t buy meat, bodyparts or products that contain pangolin (or any other exotic animals for that matter)!More Articles:* Rhinos could become extinct in less than a decade, Pangolins might perish before that: [link]* At least 222.000 pangolins killed in Malaysia in less than 2 years: [link]* Chinese customs officials seize thousands of dead pangolins: [link]* Pangolins are the most frequently seized mammal in Asia’s illegal wildlife trade: [link]* Up to 80% of the illegal wildlife smuggled out of Southeast Asia is headed for China: [link]Picture sources:www.een.comblog.tropicalsky.iewww.en.wikipedia.orgwww.tatliaskim.orgwww.guardian.co.ukbushwarriors.orgbushwarriors.wordpress.com

THE UNKNOWN PERIL OF THE PANGOLIN

I have permission from demiveemon on deviantart to post this here. The original deviantart post is HERE. Thank you for your permission! This is a little feature on the animal featured in our default icon, the pangolin. PLEASE SPREAD THIS POST! 

——-

It’s become obvious to us that very few people know of the existence of an animal called pangolin. Out of those, an even smaller fraction know that these amazing animals are rapidly facing extinction due to poachery and a never ending appetite for their meat and body parts on the Chinese and Vietnam black market.

Over the past hours we’ve gathered information and photos from the internet and it’s been a stomach twisting experience. We hereby want to turn the spotlight on the pangolin’s plight and bring it to public attention so please, spare some minutes of your time and keep on reading. 

8 things everyone needs know about the pangolin’s peril and the burgeoning black market: 

* The demand for pangolins and their body parts stems almost exclusively from East and Southeast Asia, and especially from China and Vietnam.

* Pangolin meat is consumed as a delicacy, while their scales, blood, and fetuses are used to make traditional medicines. Subscribers of this ideology superstitiously use these substances to treat a number of health issues; for example, to reduce swelling, improve liver function, boost weight loss, stimulate blood circulation, increase fertility, and to enhance lactation in breast-feeding women. Stuffed pangolins are sold as souvenirs and ornamental displays, and their skin and scales are also used to make fashion accessories.

* There is no scientific evidence to support the medicinal claims surrounding the use of pangolin scales or body parts. In fact, the scales—which are one of the most sought after parts of the animal—are made of keratin, the same protein that our own hair and nails, horse hooves, and rhino horn are composed of. Scientific studies on rhino horn have repeatedly proven it to be void of any medicinal properties, which suggests the same is true of pangolin scales.

* All eight species of pangolin are currently listed on the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) Appendix II, which means only limited trade is permitted. However, a zero annual export quota has been established for all four Asian species, which means no pangolins can be exported from any country in the world. Many countries have also established legislation to further protect these animals from poaching.

* Pangolins do not survive well in captivity, which means essentially all of these animals in the illegal trade have been sourced from the wild. This has devastating impacts for remaining populations.

* As with most illegal wildlife trade, organized crime syndicates have commercialized the exploitation of these animals and are the largest suppliers of this black market industry. As pangolins are fairly slow in reproduction, they are being harvested at rates far above what they are capable of replenishing populations at.

* All four Asian species are threatened with extinction. The Chinese and Sunda pangolins are listed as endangered, while the Indian and Malayan species are both classified as ‘Near Threatened’.

* There are, currently, no reliable estimates for population sizes, as their elusive, nocturnal nature challenges researchers’ ability to study them in their habitat. Basically, we have no firm idea of how many may remain in the wild, meaning the most endangered species may be perilously close to extinction.”

Quote Source: [link]

What you can do:

* The far easiest action you can take is by simply spreading the word! The major reason for the vast poaching of pangolins is the misbelief that medicine based on bodyparts and bodyfluids of exotic animals would have any beneficial effect on your health, sexuality or luck. In the long run only a change of attitude and education can bring an end to this atrocity.

* Visit these pages for more information on what you can do and the possibility to make a donation. 
Savepangolins.org [link]
Bushwarriors.org [link]
Traffic.org [link]

* Don’t buy meat, bodyparts or products that contain pangolin (or any other exotic animals for that matter)!


More Articles:

* Rhinos could become extinct in less than a decade, Pangolins might perish before that: [link]

* At least 222.000 pangolins killed in Malaysia in less than 2 years: [link]

* Chinese customs officials seize thousands of dead pangolins: [link]

* Pangolins are the most frequently seized mammal in Asia’s illegal wildlife trade: [link]

* Up to 80% of the illegal wildlife smuggled out of Southeast Asia is headed for China: [link]

Picture sources:

www.een.com
blog.tropicalsky.ie
www.en.wikipedia.org
www.tatliaskim.org
www.guardian.co.uk
bushwarriors.org
bushwarriors.wordpress.com

December 7, 2011 8:25 am November 17, 2011 9:51 pm

SYRIAN HAMSTER (Mesocricetus auratus)

STATUS: VULNERABLE

The golden hamster or Syrian hamsterMesocricetus auratus, is a very well known member of the rodent subfamily Cricetinae, the hamsters. In the wild they are now considered vulnerable. Their numbers have been in decline due to loss of habitat (caused by agriculture) and deliberate destruction by humans. However, they are popular as pets and scientific research animals. Adults grow from 5 to 7 inches (13 to 18 cm) in length, and have an average lifespan of 1000 days or 2 to 3 years. The golden hamster is a crepuscular animal. Hamsters sleep during the day in the deepest part of their burrow to avoid predators. They tend to wake up just after sunset, late at night and at dawn, which leads some to falsely describe them as nocturnal. (wikipedia)

Current Status: This species has a small range (extent of occurrence is definitely less than 20,000 km² and potentially less than 5,000 km²) and is restricted to a small, fragmented area on the Turkish/Syrian border. The species is undergoing continuing decline from habitat loss (due to agriculture) and persecution. Population densities are believed to be low. In Turkey, the species is very rare; only three localities are known. There may be fewer than 2,500 mature individuals in the population, but more data are required to confirm this. (IUCN

Kelly’s Comment: Some of you may be shocked to see these little guys on the list. In this case, despite their popularity as pets, it has nothing to do with the pet trade. In fact, all domestic hamsters in captivity throughout the US come from either one mother hamster and her litter or a pair of brother and sister hamsters (there are conflicting reports) taken from the wild in the 1930s. In Syria, hamsters are considered an agricultural pest, and unfortunately for them, there are no conservation measures protecting them. Also, it is difficult to survey the population of these creatures since much of their range is within a military zone on the border of Syria and Turkey. Hamsters are my absolute favorite animals. I’ve had them as pets since I was quite young, so it really broke my heart when I found out their status in the wild. Not only are they endangered, but scientists barely know anything about the way they live in the wild. I was actually only able to find one photo of a wild Syrian Hamster! The other images I’ve chosen are domestic hamsters that I felt reflected the colorization of the wild hamster best (although a couple are long-haired, something that only occurs in domestic hamsters. I also believe the white banding on the center is a domestic only trait).

Photo Credit: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.


November 16, 2011 9:16 pm

 

ICE BUGS (Grylloblattids)

STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

Grylloblattids (also known as ice crawlers or rock crawlers) are a poorly known group of insects named for their resemblance to both crickets and cockroaches. They are restricted to cold and extreme habitats such as glaciated mountains or ice caves. Grylloblattids are found only in Japan, Siberia, the northwestern United States, and western Canada. There are 26 species known worldwide; the 10 North American species are restricted to icy mountains in Montana, California, Oregon, Washington, and western Canada.  (info)

Current Status:  As glaciers and ice fields recede due to the effects of climate change many grylloblattid habitats are threatened. Therefore, Grylloblattodea stands as the least known and the most threatened insect order. Conservation efforts are further complicated by an almost complete lack of information on grylloblattid life history, biology, and behavior. For example, the IUCN hasn’t evaluated their status since 1996 and based on climate change since then, they are probably closer to endangered/critically endangered rather than vulnerable (iucn)

Jennie’s Comment:  Okay, so this isn’t the cutest endangered animal, but it’s super cool. I just found out about this family of extremophile and wingless insects that live in the cold on top of mountains and I was so in awe of them. I think the last place I’d expect insects to be is near glaciers, but here they are, living their life. But as Purdue’s Entomology department notes in this video on the little guys, they are critically endangered and their habit is literally melting away.